• ICAT-EGVE 2015

    ICAT-EGVE 2015 is the merger of the 25th International Conference on Artificial Reality and Telexistence (ICAT 2015) and the 20th Eurographics Symposium on Virtual Environments (EGVE 2015). ICAT-EGVE 2015 will be held in Kyoto, Japan between October 28 to 30, conveniently scheduled before SIGGRAPH Asia 2015 in Kobe. This international event will be a unique opportunity for researchers, developers, and users to share their experience and knowledge of virtual reality, as well as augmented reality, mixed reality and 3D user interfaces. And, of course, it is a good time to renew friendships, make new ones, and experience the cultural capital of Japan at the best time of year.

    For the second year in a row, Kyoto, Japan -- a city that could be described as the antithesis to the bustling energy of Tokyo -- has been voted the world’s best city by readers of Travel + Leisure magazine.

    October 28-30, 2015

    Kyoto International Community House, Kyoto, Japan


  • ICAT-EGVE 2015

    ICAT-EGVE 2015 is the merger of the 25th International Conference on Artificial Reality and Telexistence (ICAT 2015) and the 20th Eurographics Symposium on Virtual Environments (EGVE 2015). ICAT-EGVE 2015 will be held in Kyoto, Japan between October 28 to 30, conveniently scheduled before SIGGRAPH Asia 2015 in Kobe. This international event will be a unique opportunity for researchers, developers, and users to share their experience and knowledge of virtual reality, as well as augmented reality, mixed reality and 3D user interfaces. And, of course, it is a good time to renew friendships, make new ones, and experience the cultural capital of Japan at the best time of year.

    For the second year in a row, Kyoto, Japan -- a city that could be described as the antithesis to the bustling energy of Tokyo -- has been voted the world’s best city by readers of Travel + Leisure magazine.

    October 28-30, 2015

    Kyoto International Community House, Kyoto, Japan


Welcome


We invite you to participate in ICAT-EGVE 2015, the merger of the 25th International Conference on Artificial Reality and Telexistence (ICAT 2015) and the 20h Eurographics Symposium on Virtual Environments (EGVE 2015) in Kyoto, Japan. This international event will be a unique opportunity for researchers, developers, and users to share their experience and knowledge of virtual reality, as well as augmented reality, mixed reality and 3D user interfaces. And, of course, it is a good time to renew friendships, make new ones, and experience the cultural capital of Japan at the best time of year.

ICAT - the International Conference on Artificial Reality and Telexistence - is the oldest international conference on Virtual Reality and Telexistence, started in 1991. Artificial Reality and Telexistence augment human ability in perception, understanding, action, time and space. They also enable humans seemingly to be everywhere at the same time, i.e., enable humans to be virtually ubiquitous. ICAT has been held in various cities around the world, including Tokyo, Taipei (2000), Seoul (2004), Christchurch (2005), Hanzhou (2006), Esbjerg (2007), Yokohama (2008), Lyon (2009), Adelaide (2010), Osaka (2011), Madrid (2012), Tokyo (2013), and Bremen (2014).

EGVE - the Eurographics International Symposium on Virtual Environments - is the Eurographics Symposium for the exchange of experience and knowledge among researchers and developers concerned with using and improving virtual reality. It started in 1993 as a workshop, and successful symposiums have recently been held in Zurich 2003, Grenoble 2004, Aalborg 2005, Lisbon 2006, Weimar 2007, Eindhoven 2008, Lyon 2009, Stuttgart 2010, Nottingham 2011, Madrid 2012, Paris 2013, and Bremen 2014.

ICAT and EGVE were already merged two times, in Lyon in 2009, and in Madrid in 2012. After these two very successful experiences, and many formal and informal discussions, the steering committees of both ICAT and EGVE expressed the desire to expand and strengthen their cooperation through the merger of the ICAT conference and the EGVE conference into a conference named ICAT-EGVE. The aim of the merger is to expand the conference in order to make it one of the foremost scientific conferences in the field of virtual reality in future. We have already noticed an improvement for 2014, and we are looking forward for an excellent conference for 2015.

ICAT-EGVE 2015
VRSJ with EUROGRAPHICS
VRSJ with EUROGRAPHICS
REIC Tohoku University
Tateishi Science and Technology Foundation

Call for Papers

ICAT-EGVE 2015 will be the 25th International Conference on Artificial Reality and Telexistence (ICAT 2015) and the 20th Eurographics Symposium on Virtual Environments (EGVE 2015) in Kyoto, Japan between October 28 to 30, conveniently scheduled before SIGGRAPH Asia 2015 in Japan. This international event will be a unique opportunity for researchers, developers, and users to share their experience and knowledge of virtual reality, as well as augmented reality, mixed reality and 3D user interfaces. And, of course, it is a good time to renew friendships, make new ones, and experience Japan and their innovative researches in virtual reality.

This year we are offering several deadlines in order to attract more high quality research. Our first deadline is specifically targeted for those research papers who wish to receive English proofreading. In addition, we have two types of submission: with rebuttal or without rebuttal. You can choose your preferred reviewing process.

ICAT-EGVE 2015 seeks original, high-quality research papers in all areas of virtual reality, as well as augmented reality, mixed reality and 3D user interfaces. Research papers should describe results that contribute to advancements in the following areas:

  • - 3D interaction for VR/AR
  • - VR/AR systems and toolkits
  • - Immersive projection technologies and other advanced display technologies
  • - Presence, cognition, and embodiment in VR/AR/MR
  • - Haptics, audio, and other non-visual modalities
  • - User studies and evaluation
  • - Multi-user and distributed VR, tele-immersion and tele-presence
  • - Serious games and edutainment using VR/AR/MR
  • - Novel devices (both input and output) for VR, AR, MR, and haptics
  • - Applications of VR/AR/MR

Papers in other related areas are welcome, too, of course. All accepted papers will be published in the Digital Library of the Eurographics. In addition, they will be cited and indexed in the ACM Digital Library and IEEE Xplore, including the DOI.

Submission (Papers)

ICAT-EGVE uses a double-blind review process. Therefore, submissions should not contain information (including citations and optional videos) that unnecessarily identifies the authors or their institutions or places of work.

  • Full papers must be in English and not exceed eight (8) pages in length.
  • Short papers must be in English and not exceed four (4) pages in length.
  • Both full and short papers should be formatted using the Eurographics format.

All papers must be submitted electronically as PDF files. Authors are encouraged to submit videos to aid the program committee in the review of their submissions. Papers must be submitted through Easychair.


UPDATED Submission detail (Last update : Apr 9 June 10, 2015)

About English proofreading service and rebuttal

  • We offer three types of submission processes:

    • with English proofreading and rebuttal
    • with rebuttal
    • without rebuttal

    A sequence of the submission processes is shown in the figure below. About Kyoto

Pros of with / without rebuttal are as follows:

  • With rebuttal
    • Authors have an opportunity to write a short message to correct factual errors in reviews, or to answer questions asked by reviewers.
  • Without rebuttal
    • Owing to a short turnaround time, you can show your latest research result. On the other hand, whether the paper comes through rebuttal or not doesn't affect a criteria for acceptance judgement and a treatment after acceptance.

How can I use the English proofreading service?

  • ICAT-EGVE 2015 offers English proofreading service for submitters.

    • Prepare your manuscript in Eurographics format.
    • Submit your PDF through the following "Submit" button.
    • Receive proofreading result by volunteer proofreaders in two or three weeks.

    The submission page for English proofreading will open soon.

How can I submit the rebuttal?

  • After all the reviews are in, authors will have about 7 days two weeks (Updated on June 10) to submit a rebuttal if they feel that the reviewers have made factual errors, or to answer specific questions asked by the reviewers.

    We encourage the submission of a rebuttal regardless of the scores that authors receive. Authors will prepare a rebuttal as PDF file and submit to EasyChair. The rebuttal is confined to 500 words in length and must be self-contained. For instance, URLs to additional material are not allowed. The rebuttal period is for addressing factual errors in the reviews, not for getting revised text or new results into the review process. Any such novel material will be disregarded.

Awards

As in previous years, the authors of the best papers (to be selected by the award committee) will be offered to submit an extended version of their paper to the journal Presence.


Important Dates

DEAD LINE HAS BEEN EXTENDED!! (Updated on July 14)

English proofreading before submission   April 13, 2015
Submission deadlines with rebuttalMay 11, 2015
Submission deadlines without rebuttal July 1, 2015   July 8, 2015
Submission deadlines without rebuttal (posters / demos) July 15, 2015   July 31, 2015    Extended!
Notification of results September 1, 2015
Camera-ready September 7, 2015
Conference October 28-30, 2015


Call for Posters and Demonstrations

Poster/demo submissions may describe work in progress, preliminary results, novel ideas, systems or applications in the fields related to virtual reality, augmented reality, mixed reality and 3D user interfaces. Because posters and demos are not considered as formal publications, work submitted as a poster/demo is eligible for future publication in other venues. You can submit both a paper and a poster/demo on a topic, and some authors of rejected papers will be advised to present their work as posters and demos. Posters and demos at ICAT-EGVE 2015 provide a unique opportunity for researchers, developers, and users to share their experience and knowledge.

You can submit both a paper and a poster/demo on a topic. Some paper submissions may be immediately accepted as a poster and / or a demo. If that is the case, you don't have to shrink your manuscript down to the 2 page limit of a standard poster / demo submission and can maintain the original length. Alternatively, you are also allowed to submit a standard manuscript (max. 2 pages) for replacement upon request. (Updated on July 8)

Poster/demo submissions should address one or more of the following topics. Unlisted but related topics are also welcome:

  • - 3D interaction for VR/AR
  • - VR/AR systems and toolkits
  • - Immersive projection technologies and other advanced display technologies
  • - Presence, cognition, and embodiment in VR/AR/MR
  • - Haptics, audio, and other non-visual modalities
  • - User studies and evaluation
  • - Multi-user and distributed VR, tele-immersion and tele-presence
  • - Serious games and edutainment using VR/AR/MR
  • - Novel devices (both input and output) for VR, AR, MR, and haptics
  • - Applications of VR/AR/MR

For each accepted poster/demo, at least one author must be present at the poster/demo in a dedicated area and at a fast-forward presentation session, which gives the authors a chance to orally present a very brief summary of their work to all conference attendees. Posters should be prepared in A0 portrait format (We will provide a poster panel of 1800(H) x 900(W) [mm]).

Submission (Posters and Demonstrations)

An extended abstract of the poster/demo must be submitted as a two page (posters) or a one page (demos) manuscript as a maximum two page manuscript (updated July 8). It must be written in English using the Eurographics format and submitted electronically as a PDF file through the online submission system, Easychair.

A demo submission must also accompany a one page “demo plan” in free format. A demo plan should include size, space, power consumption, lighting and any other environmental requirements to display your work. Please include a schematic of the layout (showing components such as tables, chairs, projectors etc.). Authors can submit a ZIP file containing supplemental material, such as movies and images.

Submissions to ICAT-EGVE 2015 will be reviewed using a double-blind review process. Therefore, submissions should not contain information that unnecessarily identifies the authors or their institutions or places of work.

Awards

To encourage high-quality submissions, awards will be presented to the best posters and demos. The best posters will be selected by review scores and presentation evaluation by poster chairs at the conference. The best demos will be selected by review scores and audience votes at the conference.

Important Dates

Submission deadlines without rebuttal (posters / demos) July 15, 2015   July 31, 2015    Extended!
Notification of results September 1, 2015
Camera-ready September 7, 2015
Conference October 28-30, 2015

Contact

For any questions, please contact Demo Co-Chairs and Poster Co-Chairs .

Venue


About Kyoto

About Kyoto
About Kyoto
About Kyoto

For the second year in a row, Kyoto, Japan -- a city that could be described as the antithesis to the bustling energy of Tokyo -- has been voted the world’s best city by readers of Travel + Leisure magazine.

Since Kyoto had been the capital of Japan for more than one thousand years from 794 to 1868 AD, Kyoto is the most historic and attractive city in Japan. Seventeen World Cultural Heritage Sites as designated by UNESCO are the jewels in the crown of Kyoto city. In addition to beautiful Imperial Villas, Kyoto has about 400 Shinto shrines and 1,650 Buddhist temples which dot the entire city. Innumerable cultural treasures and traditional crafts, as well as beautiful spring cherry blossoms and autumnal colours, attract visitors to Kyoto, both from within and without Japan. Today, the city of Kyoto is also a bustling academic city that is young-at-heart, with nearly 50 institutions of higher education, and a home to many world-class corporate research giants. The spirit of Kyoto lies in the unique blend of old and new, taking the best of the old and applying them to the future.

About Venue

The Kyoto International Community House was opened in 1989 to provide a space for interaction and cross-cultural communication between the citizens of Kyoto City and people of other cultures. It is a place where people can come together, discuss various ideas, and learn more about each other. To date, more than 5,000,000 people used the facilities and participated in the wide range of activities available at Kyoto International Community House.

Location

Kyoto International Community House, Event Hall

2-1 Torii-cho, Awataguchi, Sakyo-ku Kyoto, 606-8536, JAPAN

Access

To Kyoto Station

Located on the main Shinkansen (Bullet Train) Line, Kyoto is directly accessible from NARITA (Tokyo), HANEDA (Tokyo), Centrair (Nagoya) and KANSAI (Osaka) International Airports.

  • About 75 minutes by Airport Shuttle Train “Haruka” from Kansai International Airport to Kyoto Station.
  • About 55 minutes by Limousine bus from Osaka (Itami) Airport to Kyoto Station.
  • 2 hours 15 minutes by Shinkansen (Bullet Train) from Tokyo Station to Kyoto Station.

To Venue from Kyoto Station

By Bus
  • No.5 or Express No.5 of City Bus to “Okazakikoen Bijutsukan Heianjingumae” Bus stop, and 10 minutes walk.
By Train
  • Karasuma Subway Line to “Karasuma Oike” station (change to the Line), Tozai Subway Line to “Keage” station, and 6 minutes walk.

Accommodation

Following links show available hotels near the conference venue assuming the check-in/out dates are October 27th and 31st, 2015, respectively. Please check and modify the search conditions as you need.

Keynote


image in slider slide

Kokichi Sugihara - Keynote 1 (October 28th)

Professor and Vice President of the Meiji Institute for Advanced Study of Mathematical Sciences, Meiji University

How Does Human Interpret Images?

-- Weak Points of Our Visual Systems Learned by Mathematical Study of Optical Illusion --

Abstract

We usually feel that we can interpret images of three-dimensional objects easily and correctly. From a mathematical point of view, however, images do not contain depth information, and hence what we feel we can interpret is nothing but just the result of guessing. Indeed, we can easily cheat our brains by showing unusual objects that look usual. In this talk, we show many examples of this kind of new optical illusion including “impossible objects”, “impossible motions” and “ambiguous cylinders”, obtained by our mathematical study of optical illusion, and discuss about the advantages as well as dangers of our visual systems.

Biography

Kokichi Sugihara received Doctor’s degree in Mathematical Engineering in 1980 from the University of Tokyo. He once worked at Electrotechnical Laboratory, Nagoya University, the University of Tokyo, and has been in a current position since 2009. Research interests include mathematical engineering, computational geometry, computer vision and computer graphics. He discovered solids that realize so-called pictures of impossible objects in his research on computer vision, and has extended his research areas to optical illusion. He is now a leader of a research project titled “Computational Illusion”, and opened Illusion Museum in downtown Tokyo. He is the first-prize winner in the Best illusion Contest of the Year in 2010 and 2013.

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Sriram Subramanian - Keynote 2 (October 29th)

Professor, School of Engineering & Informatics, University of Sussex, UK

Shape of Things to Come

Abstract

One of the visions on my research is to deliver novel experiences to users without instrumenting them with wearable or head-mounted displays. My team has been exploring various technical solutions to creating systems that can deform and transform into new objects or shapes while still supporting the display of visual content. For example, we created shape-changing tablets that can show maps with topographical information and morphing mirrors that can enable new forms of augmentation. In this talk, I will present some of our recent projects on this topic and conclude with the use of acoustic radiation forces to create shape-shifting atoms.

Biography

Sriram Subramanian is a Professor of Informatics at the University of Sussex where he leads a research group on novel interactive systems. Before joining Sussex, he was a Professor of Human-computer Interaction at the University of Bristol (till July 2015) and prior to this a senior scientist at Philips Research Netherlands. He holds an ERC Starting Grant and has received funding from the EU FET-open call. In 2014 he was one of 30 young scientists invited by the WEF to attend their Summer Davos. Subramanian is also the co-founder of Ultrahaptics a spin-out company that aims to commercialise the mid-air haptics enabled by his ERC grant. In 2015, Ultrahaptics won the CES 2015 top pick award for Best Enabling Technology. Prof. Subramanian's research has been featured in several news media outlets around the world including CNN, BBC and Fox-News.

image in slider slide

Hiroo Iwata - Keynote 3 (October 30th)

Professor, Department of Intelligent Interaction Technologies, University of Tsukuba

From Haptics to Empowerment Informatics

Abstract

This talk introduces history of Iwata’s haptics research during a quarter century. The research includes sense of touch and walking. His activity expands to a new art form named “Device Art” in which interface devices become essence of expression. In 2014, he launched the Ph.D. program in Empowerment Informatics. Empowerment Informatics has three pillars; supplementation, harmony and extension of human. Haptics is a key technology in these areas. More over Device Art greatly contribute to extension of human.

Biography

Hiroo Iwata is a professor in the Graduate School of Systems and Information Engineering of the University of Tsukuba, where he is teaching human interface and leading research projects on virtual reality. His research interests include haptic interface, locomotion interface and spatially immersive display. He received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degree in engineering from the University of Tokyo in 1981, 1983 and 1986, respectively. He is a vice president of the Virtual Reality Society of Japan from 2010. He exhibited his work at the Emerging Technologies venue of the SIGGRAPH every year from 1994 to 2007, as well as Ars Electronica Festival 96,97,99, and 2001. He was the general chair of the World Haptics Conference 2007 and Asia Haptics 2014.


Program


Awards

  • Best Paper
    • An Evaluation of the Effects of Hyper-Natural Components of Interaction Fidelity on Locomotion Performance in Virtual Reality
      Mahdi Nabiyouni and Doug A. Bowman.

  • Honorable Mentions
    • Development of Mutual Telexistence System using Virtual Projection of Operator's Egocentric Body Images
      Mhd Yamen Saraiji, Charith Lasantha Fernando, Kouta Minamizawa and Susumu Tachi.

    • Influence of Path Complexity on Spatial Overlap Perception In Virtual Environments
      Khrystyna Vasylevska and Hannes Kaufmann.

  • Best Posters
    • Moving Towards Natural Interaction Between Multiscale Avatars in Multi-User Virtual Environments
      Eike Langbehn, Gerd Bruder and Frank Steinicke.

    • Synthesizing Avatar Motion by Blending User Body Movements and Sample Motion Segments
      Rina Tanaka, Hiroshi Mori, Fubito Toyama and Kenji Shoji.

  • Best Poster “Audience” Award
    • Moving Towards Natural Interaction Between Multiscale Avatars in Multi-User Virtual Environments
      Eike Langbehn, Gerd Bruder and Frank Steinicke.

    • Synthesizing Avatar Motion by Blending User Body Movements and Sample Motion Segments
      Rina Tanaka, Hiroshi Mori, Fubito Toyama and Kenji Shoji.

    • Reproducibility of the Verification for an Urushi-based Electronic Circuit
      Yu Myojin and Yuki Hashimoto.

  • Best Demo
    • Development of Mutual Telexistence System using Virtual Projection of Operator's Egocentric Body Images
      Mhd Yamen Saraiji, Charith Lasantha Fernando, Kouta Minamizawa and Susumu Tachi.

  • Demo Award 2nd Place
    • Development of Encountered-type Haptic Interface that can Independently Control Volume and Rigidity of 3D Virtual Object
      Naoki Takizawa, Hiroaki Yano, Hiroo Iwata, Yukio Oshiro and Nobuhiro Ohkohchi.

    • Scope+ : A Stereoscopic Video See-Through Augmented Reality Microscope
      Yu-Hsuan Huang, Pei-Hsuan Tsai, Tzu-Chieh Yu, Yu-Xiang Wang, Wan-Ling Yang and Ming Ouhyoung.

Schedule

Papers

  • Collaboration (9:50am - 12:00pm, Oct 28)
    • Chair: Gregory Welch
    • The Stretchable Arms for Collaborative Remote Guiding (short)
      Morgan Le Chénéchal, Thierry Duval, Valerie Gouranton, Jerome Royan and Bruno Arnaldi.

    • An HMD-based Mixed Reality System for Avatar-Mediated Remote Collaboration with Bare-hand Interaction
      Seung-Tak Noh, Hui-Shyong Yeo and Woontack Woo.

    • Development of Mutual Telexistence System using Virtual Projection of Operator's Egocentric Body Images
      Mhd Yamen Saraiji, Charith Lasantha Fernando, Kouta Minamizawa and Susumu Tachi.

    • Effectiveness of Spatial Coherent Remote Drive Experience with a Telexistence Backhoe for Construction Sites
      Charith Lasantha Fernando, MHD Yamen Saraiji, Yoshio Seishu, Nobuo Kuriu, Kouta Minamizawa and Susumu Tachi.

    • Mutual Proximity Awareness in Immersive Multi-User Virtual Environments with Real Walking
      Iana Podkosova and Hannes Kaufmann.

  • Perception (2:40pm - 5:00pm, Oct 28)
    • Chair: Hiroyuki Kajimoto
    • Anthropomorphism and Illusion of Virtual Body Ownership
      Jean-Luc Lugrin, Johanna Latt and Marc Erich Latoschik.

    • Visually Induced Motion Sickness Estimation and Prediction in Virtual Reality using Frequency Components Analysis of Postural Sway Signal
      Jean-Rémy Chardonnet, Mohammad Ali Mirzaei and Frédéric Mérienne.

    • R-V Dynamics Illusion: Psychophysical Phenomenon Caused by the Difference between Dynamics of Real Object and Virtual Object
      Yuta Kataoka, Satoshi Hashiguchi, Fumihisa Shibata and Asako Kimura.

    • Influence of Path Complexity on Spatial Overlap Perception In Virtual Environments
      Khrystyna Vasylevska and Hannes Kaufmann.

    • Analysis of Depth Perception with Virtual Mask in Stereoscopic AR
      Mai Otsuki, Hideaki Kuzuoka and Paul Milgram.

  • Movement (9:25am - 10:30am, Oct 29)
    • Chair: Yasushi Ikei
    • An Evaluation of the Effects of Hyper-Natural Components of Interaction Fidelity on Locomotion Performance in Virtual Reality
      Mahdi Nabiyouni and Doug A. Bowman.

    • Physical Space Requirements for Redirected Walking: How Size and Shape Affect Performance
      Mahdi Azmandian, Timofey Grechkin, Mark Bolas and Evan Suma.

    • Global Landmarks Do Not Necessarily Improve Spatial Performance in Addition to Bodily Self-Movement Cues when Learning a Large-Scale Virtual Environment
      Tobias Meilinger, Jörg Schulte-Pelkum, Julias Frankenstein, Daniel Berger and Heinrich H. Bülthoff.

  • Modeling for VR (10:45am - 12:00pm, Oct 29)
    • Chair: Dirk Reiners
    • Yther: A Proposal and Initial Prototype of a Virtual Reality Content Sharing System
      Anthony Steed.

    • Roles in Collaborative Virtual Environments for Training
      Guillaume Claude, Valerie Gouranton and Bruno Arnaldi.

    • How to Time Travel in Highly Immersive Virtual Reality
      Rodrigo Pizarro, Keren-Or Berkers, Mel Slater and Doron Friedman.

  • Haptics & Sensing (9:40am - 12:00pm, Oct 30)
    • Chair: Wataru Hashimoto
    • Bimanual Haptic Simulation of Bone Fracturing for the Training of the Bilateral Sagittal Split Osteotomy
      Thomas Claus Knott and Torsten Wolfgang Kuhlen.

    • Development of Encountered-type Haptic Interface that can Control Volume and Rigidity of 3D Virtual Object Independently
      Naoki Takizawa, Hiroaki Yano and Hiroo Iwata.

    • Ring-shaped Haptic Device with Vibrotactile Feedback Patterns to Support Natural Spatial Interaction
      Oscar Ariza, Paul Lubos, Frank Steinicke and Gerd Bruder.

    • CollarBeat: Whole Body Vibrotactile Presentation via the Collarbone to Enrich Music Listening Experience
      Rei Sakuragi, Sakiko Ikeno, Ryuta Okazaki and Hiroyuki Kajimoto.

    • Hybrid Eye Tracking: Combining Iris Contour and Corneal Imaging
      Alexander Plopski, Christian Nitschke, Kiyoshi Kiyokawa, Dieter Schmalstieg and Haruo Takemura.

  • Display (2:40pm - 5:00pm, Oct 30)
    • Chair: Michael Cohen
    • Structural Color Display on Retro-reflective Objects
      Toshiyuki Amano and Kensuke Minami.

    • Fast robust and precise shadow algorithm for WebGL 1.0 platform
      Tomáš Milet, Michal Tóth, Jan Pečiva, Tomáš Starka, Jozef Kobrtek and Pavel Zemčík.

    • X-Dimensional Display: Superimposing 2D Cross-Sectional Image inside 3D Wireframe Aerial Image
      Yoshikazu Furuyama, Yasutoshi Makino and Hiroyuki Shinoda.

    • Comparison and Evaluation of Viewpoint Quality Estimation Algorithms for Immersive Virtual Environments
      Sebastian Freitag, Benjamin Weyers, Andrea Bönsch and Torsten Kuhlen.

Posters

  • [P1]    Multi-modal Interaction with a Context-aware AR Virtual Pet
    Qifan Wu, Jason Orlosky, Haruo Takemura and Kiyoshi Kiyokawa.

  • [P2]     Direction indication mechanism by tugging on user's clothing for a wearable message robot
    Hirotake Yamazoe and Tomoko Yonezawa.

  • [P3]     Effect of proprioceptive vibrations on simulator sickness during navigation task in virtual environment
    Jérémy Plouzeau, Damien Paillot, Jean-Remy Chardonnet and Frédéric Merienne.

  • [P4]     A Study for Vision Based Data Glove with Back Image of Hand
    Yutaro Mori, Kazuki Kawashima, Yu Yoshida, Masahiro Okada and Kenji Funahashi.

  • [P5]     Moving Towards Natural Interaction Between Multiscale Avatars in Multi-User Virtual Environments
    Eike Langbehn, Gerd Bruder and Frank Steinicke.

  • [P6]     Synthesizing Avatar Motion by Blending User Body Movements and Sample Motion Segments
    Rina Tanaka, Hiroshi Mori, Fubito Toyama and Kenji Shoji.

  • [P7]     Reproducibility of the Verification for an Urushi-based Electronic Circuit
    Yu Myojin and Yuki Hashimoto.

  • [P8]     Analyses of Spatial Ballistic Movements for Prediction of Targets in Reach to Grasp Tasks
    Dennis Krupke, Gerd Bruder and Frank Steinicke.

  • [P9]     Effects of Bell Facilities' Sound Environments on Immersive Experience of Virtual Scenes
    Kuroda Ryosuke, Matsuda Ken, Kusumi Takashi and Tsuji Seiji.

  • [P10]   Perceptual Characteristics of a Tactile Illusion Using Toenail-Mounted Vibration
    Kensuke Sakai and Yuki Hashimoto.

  • [P11]   Reaching movement to the target partly occluded by an AR object
    Akiyuki Matsumoto and Hiroaki Shigemasu.

Demos

  • [D1]     Pitching Training Serious Game using Visual and Sound Effect
    Yuki Tsukamoto and Kaoru Sumi.

  • [D2]     A Projection Simulator to Support the Development of a Spherical Immersive Display
    Wataru Hashimoto, Yasuharu Mizutani and Satoshi Nishiguchi.

  • [D3]     Accurate Passive Eye-Pose Estimation through Corneal Imaging
    Alexander Plopski, Christian Nitschke, Kiyoshi Kiyokawa, Dieter Schmalstieg and Haruo Takemura.

  • [D4]     Development of Encountered-type Haptic Interface that can Independently Control Volume and Rigidity of 3D Virtual Object
    Naoki Takizawa, Hiroaki Yano, Hiroo Iwata, Yukio Oshiro and Nobuhiro Ohkohchi.

  • [D5]     Oil Bubble Display: Oil Display for Flexible Interaction with Projected Images
    Junki Kawaguchi, Yuta Ideguchi, Yuki Uranishi, Shunsuke Yoshimoto, Yoshihiro Kuroda, Masataka Imura and Osamu Oshiro.

  • [D6]     Development of Mutual Telexistence System using Virtual Projection of Operator’s Egocentric Body Images
    Mhd Yamen Saraiji, Charith Lasantha Fernando, Kouta Minamizawa and Susumu Tachi.

  • [D7]     Exocentric Visualization of "Reality Distortion" Interface to Interpret Egocentric Reprojection Perspective
    Michael Cohen, Tomohiro Oyama and Naoki Tsukida.

  • [D8]     Scope+ : A Stereoscopic Video See-Through Augmented Reality Microscope
    Yu-Hsuan Huang, Pei-Hsuan Tsai, Tzu-Chieh Yu, Yu-Xiang Wang, Wan-Ling Yang and Ming Ouhyoung.

Instruction

Fast Forward (Poster / Demo)

Chair: Gerd Bruder

2:30pm - 3pm, October 29, 2015

Before each poster/demo session, a 30-minute session will take place in which poster/demo presenters will have the chance to give a 60-second presentation describing your work. During the flash talks you will be lined up on the stage and given a turn, in order of submission number, to give your talk. Slides will be advanced for you between talks.

  • Time of flash talk:
    • 60 second to describe your work
  • Format rules:
    • PPTX/PPT format
    • Title, presentation number, author names and their affiliations must be included
      Your presentation number is described at the head of your presentation title above.
    • You can use videos, but the videos must be embedded in your slide
    • 3:4 slide size
    • No page limit
  • PC in session room will be provided with the following configuration:
    • Microsoft Windows 10 Home
    • Microsoft Office 2013 Professional
    • Windows Media Player (Version 12)

Slide Templete

You can use ICAT Official Power Point Templete. This is optional.

Banquet - FUNATSURU

About Kyoto
About Kyoto
About Kyoto
Reprinted by permission. Copyright © Value Management Inc.

The famous Japanese phrase "sanshi suimei" describes Kyoto's scenic beauty; it is a uniquely Japanese phrase which simultaneously expresses the beauty of the Higashiyama Mountains when they take on a purplish hue and of the Kamogawa's pure, clear water. FUNATSURU is where you can see the scenery embodying this phrase. Here you can enjoy Kyoto's many faces throughout the four seasons, including cherry blossoms in spring, cool riverside dinners and fire festivals in summer, and splendid autumn foliage. Encounters with exquisitely dressed geisha are hardly rare. FUNATSURU, a vestige of Kyoto's past, lays just a five-minute taxi ride away from JR Kyoto Station. It is located in the heart of Kyoto, where numerous shrines and temples dot the area.

FUNATSURU

180 Minoyacho, Kiyamachidouri Matsubara-Agaru, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto, 600-8015, JAPAN

7pm - 9pm, October 29, 2015


Registration


Category Type Price Available until
Early Bird Non-student / Member 400,00 € 15.Sep.2015
Non-student / Non-member 500,00 €
Student / Member 200,00 €
Student / Non-member 250,00 €
Late Non-student / Member 480,00 € -
Non-student / Non-member 600,00 €
Student / Member 240,00 €
Student / Non-member 300,00 €
Optional Additional banquet ticket 80,00 € 29.Oct.2015


Click on "ICAT-EGVE2015” in the following page.

REGISTRATION


We require that at least one author of an accepted papers/posters/demos to register and attend the conference to present the work, otherwise the paper will be removed from the program.


Conference Committee


General Co-Chairs

  • Kiyoshi Kiyokawa, Osaka University, Japan
  • Dirk Reiners, University of Arkansas at Little Rock , USA
  • Anthony Steed, University College London, UK

Executive Officer

  • Hideyuki Ando, Osaka University, Japan

Program Co-Chairs

  • Masataka Imura, Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan
  • Pablo Figueroa, Universidad de los Andes Bogotá, Colombia
  • Betty Mohler, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Germany

Award Co-Chairs

  • André Hinkenjann, Hochschule Bonn-Rhein-Sieg, Germany
  • Regis Kopper, Duke University, USA
  • Maki Sugimoto, Keio University, Japan

Poster Co-Chairs

  • Mai Otsuki, University of Tsukuba, Japan
  • Gerd Bruder, University of Hamburg, Germany
  • Sabarish Babu, Clemson University, USA

Demo Co-Chairs

  • Shunsuke Yoshimoto, Osaka University, Japan
  • Kyle Johnsen, The University of Georgia, USA
  • Marc Erich Latoschik, University of Würzburg, Germany

Local Arrangement Co-Chairs

  • Tomohiro Mashita, Osaka University, Japan
  • Sei Ikeda, Ritsumeikan University, Japan

Planning Chair

  • Yuki Hashimoto, University of Tsukuba, Japan

Publications Chair

  • Katsunari Sato, Nara Women's University, Japan

Publicity Chair

  • Naohisa Nagaya, Kyoto Sangyo University, Japan

Web Chair

  • Masahiro Furukawa, Osaka University, Japan

Chief Graphics Designer

  • Parinya Punpongsanon, Osaka University, Japan

English Proofreading Volunteers

  • Nicholas Katzakis, Technische Universität München, Germany
  • Duy-Quoc Lai, University of California, Irvine, USA
  • Damien Rompapas, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Japan
  • Soumya Paul, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Germany

International Program Committee (IPC)

  • Carlos Andujar, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain
  • Ferran Argelaguet, INRIA Rennes, France
  • Mark Billinghurst, HIT lab NZ, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
  • Roland Blach, Fraunhofer IAO, Germany
  • Wolfgang Broll, Ilmenau University of Technology, Germany
  • Pere Brunet, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain
  • Marcio Cabral, LSITEC, Brazil
  • Michael Cohen, University of Aizu, Japan
  • Sabine Coquillart, INRIA, France
  • Carolina Cruz-Neira, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, USA
  • Mirabelle D'Cruz, University of Nottingham, UK
  • Henry Been-Lirn Duh, HIT lab Australia, University of Tasmania, Australia
  • Thierry Duval, Telecom Betragne, France
  • Ulrich Eck, University of South Australia, Australia
  • Pablo Figueroa, Universidad de los Andes, Colombia
  • Bernd Fröhlich, Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Germany
  • Masahiro Furukawa, Osaka University, Japan
  • Yuki Hashimoto, University of Tsukuba, Japan
  • André Hinkenjann, Bonn-Rhine-Sieg University of Applied Sciences, Germany
  • Masataka Imura, Osaka University, Japan
  • Victoria Interrante, University of Minnesota, USA
  • Yuichi Itoh, Osaka University, Japan
  • Daisuke Iwai, Osaka University, Japan
  • Hiroyuki Kajimoto, The University of Electro-Communications, Japan
  • Yoshinari Kameda, University of Tsukuba, Japan
  • Daniel Keefe, University of Minnesota, USA
  • Itaru Kitahara, University of Tsukuba, Japan
  • Uwe Kloos, Reutlingen University, Germany
  • Naoya Koizumi, Keio University, Japan
  • Regis Kopper, Duke University, USA
  • Torsten Kuhlen, RWTH Aachen University, Germany
  • Tomohiro Kuroda, Kyoto University Hospital, Japan
  • Marc Erich Latoschik, University of Würzburg, Germany
  • Benjamin Lok, University of Florida, USA
  • Xun Luo, Qualcomm Inc., USA
  • Anderson Maciel, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
  • Koji Makita, Canon Inc., Japan
  • Sandy Martedi, Keio University, Japan
  • Tobias Meilinger, Max-Planck-Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Germany
  • Kouta Minamizawa, Keio University, Japan
  • Kazunori Miyata, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Japan
  • Betty Mohler, MPI Tübingen, Germany
  • Guillaume Moreau, Ecole Centrale de Nantes - CERMA, France
  • Takuji Narumi, The University of Tokyo, Japan
  • Luciana Nedel, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
  • Takuya Nojima, Unviersity of Electro-Communications, Tokyo
  • Mai Ohtsuki, University of Tsukuba, Japan
  • Yuji Oyamada, Waseda University, Japan
  • Bruno Raffin, INRIRA Rhône-Alpes, France
  • Nimesha Ranasinghe, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Dirk Reiners, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, USA
  • David Roberts, University of Salford, UK
  • Jeha Ryu, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Korea
  • Amela Sagadic, Naval Postgraduate School, USA
  • Daisuke Sakamoto, The University of Tokyo, Japan
  • Nobuchika Sakata, Osaka University, Japan
  • Hooman Samani, National Taipei University, Taiwan
  • Katsunari Sato, Nara Women's University, Japan
  • Myriam Servières, ECN, France
  • Fumihisa Shibata, Ritsumeikan University, Japan
  • Ross Smith, University of South Australia, Australia
  • Luciano Pereira Soares, Insper, brazil
  • Oliver Staadt, University of Rostock, Germany
  • Anthony Steed, University College London, UK
  • Frank Steinicke, University of Hamburg, Germany
  • Masanori Sugimoto, Hokkaido University, Japan
  • Bruce Thomas, University of South Australia, Australia
  • Masashi Toda, Kumamoto University, Japan
  • Laura Trutoiu, Oculus, USA
  • Hideaki Uchiyama, Kyushu University, Japan
  • Robert Van Liere, Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, The Netherlands
  • Christian Wallraven, Korea University, Korea
  • Greg Welch, University of Central Florida, USA
  • Yasuyuki Yanagida, Meijo University, Japan
  • Hiroaki Yano, University of Tsukuba, Japan
  • Gabriel Zachmann, University of Bremen, Germany
  • Nelson Zagalo, University of Minho, Portugal

ICAT International Steering Committee

  • Susumu Tachi, The University of Tokyo, Japan
  • Michitaka Hirose, The University of Tokyo, Japan
  • Ming Ouhyoung, National Taiwan University, Taiwan
  • Hyun Seung Yang, KAIST, Korea
  • Mark Billinghurst, University South Australia, Australia
  • Haruo Takemura, Osaka University, Japan
  • Zhigeng Pan, Zhejiang University, China
  • Tony Brooks, Aalborg University Esbjerg (AAUE), Denmark
  • Yasushi Ikei, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan
  • Hideo Saito, Keio University, Japan
  • Sabine Coquillart, INRIA, France
  • Yoshifumi Kitamura, Tohoku University, Japan
  • Bruce H. Thomas, University South Australia, Australia
  • Hirokazu Kato, NAIST, Japan
  • Gabriel Zachmann, University of Bremen, Germany
  • Carolina Cruz-Neira, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, USA
  • Kiyoshi Kiyokawa, Osaka University, Japan

Contact


ICAT-EGVE 2015 Conference Committee welcomes any questions, comments or general inquiries that you may have. Complete the form on the right to submit your message. Thank you very much.